Obesity Treatment Reaches New Milestone

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CONTACT:

Mollie Turner, The Obesity Society: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Obesity Treatment Reaches New Milestone

TOS Statement on Resubmission of Contrave for FDA Approval

 

Statement Attributable to:

Steven R. Smith, MD, President of The Obesity Society

 

As we continue efforts to treat obesity as a serious disease, ongoing research into the development of new obesity medications, like Contrave, can help build our obesity treatment toolbox. A five to 10 percent weight loss alone can significantly improve health, and medications have shown to support patients in achieving this milestone.

 

Weight loss based solely on behavior changes can be difficult to achieve and even more challenging to maintain. Obesity medications provide an additional tool for obesity clinicians, and produce the most weight loss when combined with diet and exercise. However, obesity drugs are not for everyone and they are not for short-term weight loss. These obesity medications are no different from others approved by the FDA, requiring a thorough physician assessment of each individual patient and continued monitoring of health for success.

 

Given the complex nature of obesity, there is no magic bullet. We must support research to develop proven and effective weight loss and maintenance strategies and to increase the number of effective, FDA-approved obesity drugs. Currently, there are more than 100 drugs for hypertension, yet only two approved for long-term use for obesity.

 

Today’s announcement is a step in the right direction as part of the development of safe and effective medications for obesity treatment.

 

 

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About The Obesity Society

The Obesity Society (TOS) is the leading professional society dedicated to better understanding, preventing and treating obesity. Through research, education and advocacy, TOS is committed to improving the lives of those affected by the disease. For more information visit: www.Obesity.org.